Thursday, March 6, 2014

Robot Takeover

Androids and such technologies are rapidly advancing. To many this may sound fascinating and well, totally awesome. At this point, I find it fascinating and totally terrifying.

So, cool robots can drive cars-- fantastic, I hate driving anyways. Thank you, Google. But, robots are beginning to replace our jobs. If we want to look further back, there is the assembly line and how that has become replaced by machines. Robots have been found in daycares, entertaining children. There are currently 4,000 robots in the United States Military; such as recon bot that scout for roadside bombs in Iraq or what was known as "pacbot" that searched for Osama Bin Laden's hideout in Afghanistan despite being unsuccessful. Sure, on the one hand I think it is fabulous these robots are potentially saving lives, but they are still taking jobs away. If eventually, robotic drive-less cars are sold to the average person, then we will no longer need traffic cops.

Chris Melhuish of the British Robotics Laboratory has created robots that use bacteria-filled fuel cells to produce electricity from rotten apples and dead flies. The goal was that the robots would be able to "fend for themselves." In other words, the robots no longer need humans to even plug them in when they have died and thus would not need humans to survive!

The founder of Carnegie Mellon's Robotics Institute, Hans Moravec, predicts that robots will emerge as their own species by the year 2040. He even says they will have "feelings and expectations." Essentially, they will have become a "more perfect" human. In a discussion with a friend, he said that technology malfunctions though. To which I replied, well humans malfunction-- terminal illness, mental breakdowns, etc. We are creating the end of humankind!

Now, I'm not really sure how much of these I believe, at this point. I'm not sure that robots will be it's own species in our lifetime. Although, the evidence shows that it could potentially happen sometime in the future.

2 comments:

  1. What's the citation or link for that Moravec? Looks like a good read!

    ReplyDelete
  2. My apologies, I meant to link the website! http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/3.10/moravec_pr.html

    ReplyDelete

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